Assignments

7B Composition

Instructor
Mrs. Katie Parr
Term
2019-2020
Department
Schools - Peoria // Main
Description
We will be utilizing the Write Source SkillsBook from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for our main composition curriculum this year. It provides students with opportunities to practice editing and proofreading skills throughout the writing process. Students will focus on MUG when writing- mechanics, usage, and grammar. The seventh grade SkillsBook will include: proofreading activities (marking punctuation, editing for mechanics, improving spelling, and using the right word), sentence activities (sentence basics, sentence problems, sentence variety), and part of speech activities (nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, interjections, and conjunctions).
 
Students will take a pretest at the beginning of the year, two quarterly progress tests, and one post test and the end of the year. The pretest is designed to determine students' level of writing experience and knowledge. It is used as the baseline for measuring students' progress from beginning of the year to the end. The progress tests help monitor students' progress and allow teachers to refine teaching plans based on individual learners. The post test will determine how much progress students have made. Each assessment has three parts. Part 1: Basic Elements of Writing and Part 2: Proofreading and Editing comprise a total of 30 multiple choice questions. Part 3: Writing provides a writing prompt in which students respond with a short essay.
 
We will also be incorporating a spelling unit throughout the course of the school year which will expose our seventh graders to 300 new words.

Upcoming Assignments RSS Feed

Due:

ELA (April 6th-10th): THIS IS FOR STUDENTS COMPLETING PAPER WORK ONLY.
Be sure to pick up printed materials from the school. Please note, to submit your work, you can either send me the answers via email or you can return the packet to school and the office staff will scan your documents to me.

Students who DO have access to technology at home should follow the weekly schedules posted to my google classroom, and complete their assignments online.
 
Day #1: Dump vs How Things Work
Read p241 to compare texts. You are going to read two poems that reflect on people's everyday experiences and relationships with material things. The first poem commemorates the dump, a place where people discard old, used, broken, or unwanted items. The second poem shares a perception about people's everyday spending and its effects on others' ability to spend. Read the background information on both authors before you set your purpose to read.
 
Read “Dump” by X.J. Kennedy (p242-243) and answer the following short response questions below. Be sure to email me your responses so I may grade them.
  1. Identify Patterns- How many stanzas does the poem have? How many lines are in each stanza? Why might the poet have chosen to organize the poem this way
  2. Analyze- Read the information on traditional form on p244. How does the poem’s form contribute to its meaning?
Day #2: Dump vs How Things Work
Read “How Things Work" by Gary Soto (p245) and answer the following short response questions below. Be sure to email me your responses so I may grade them.
  1. Interpret- In lines 5-7, what does the speak compare to rain, and what does that comparison help readers picture?
  2. Analyze- Read the information on free verse form on p246. How does the poem’s form contribute to its meaning?
Day #3: Dump vs How Things Work Quiz
You CAN use your Student Book to review the poems, "Dump," by X. J. Kennedy and "How Things Work," by Gary Soto before and during your test. You will have 10 multiple choice questions to answer for your quiz grade. You do NOT need to complete the written response questions. You can scan the quiz document to my email, or you may number your responses and just sent them to me through email.

Past Assignments

Due:

AT-HOME LEARNING ELA PACKET (March 30th- April 3rd):

Students should complete the attached packet using the schedule below. Students can download the packet and message their answers to teachers on dojo and/or email. Students should message Ms. Parr their answers for ELA and BOTH Mr. Eaton and Mr. Cameron for Science.
 
Students DO NOT need to complete the Math lessons in the packet. Our Math teacher, Mr. Muller, will post his lessons separately as he will be utilizing study island.
 
If students need paper packets, please keep an eye out for a message from our administration team listing times to pick up paper packets in driveline next week.
 
Our Social Studies teacher, Mr. Cardoza, will post his lessons separately as well.
 
Monday- p10-13 ELA, 22-25 Science, 26-30 ELA, and 33-38 Science
Tuesday- p39-43 ELA, 48-52 Science, 53-56 ELA, and 63-65 Science
Wednesday- p66-69 ELA, 77-80 Science, 81-84 ELA, and 92-95 Science
Thursday- 96-98 ELA, 104-106 Science, 107-110 ELA, and 118-121 ELA
Friday- p128-131 ELA and 132-134 Science

Due:

AT-HOME LEARNING ELA PACKET (March 23rd-27th):
Students should work on the attached packet this upcoming week during our school closure: March 23rd-27th, 2020.
I would suggest working on at least two lessons per day. I've included a brief lesson on each topic with follow up questions for independent practice.
Monday- Summarization Literature & Summarization Informational Text
Tuesday- Point of View & Meaning and Tone
Wednesday- Inferences and Conclusions & Context Clues
Thursday- Central Idea & Author's Purpose
Friday- Theme & Connotation and Denotation 
 
I would also suggest working on the coordinating study island lesson for additional practice. I will be extending the due date for study island lessons through the end of April for my sections (7A study island is taught by ELA Interventionist, Ms. Lori Weatherford, so please reach out to her for further instruction). EVERY lesson needs to be completed at grade level with at least 70% proficiency to be considered as a passing score.
 
If you cannot download and/or print the attached packet, please see my previous post on the school closure for designated times to pick up a packet in drive line next week. Students DO NOT have to print the packet so long as they write their answers on a piece of paper, organizing them by lesson name. I will be posting the answer keys on Friday asking students to self-correct their work. They will need to comment on the post for their participation grade this week. 
 
I will be available via email (kkelly@amspeoriaadvanced.org) and class dojo next week to answer any questions, and I will do my best to respond in a timely manner. Please be patient during this time as well all navigate this new online world.
 
Please let your child(ren) know that I MISS THEM and CAN'T WAIT TO SEE THEM HEALTHY upon our return to school. In the meantime, they can reach out to me with any questions and/or concerns.

Due:

AT-HOME LEARNING ELA PACKET ANSWER KEY(March 23rd-27th):
Students should use the attached answer key to self-correct their at-home learning packet from this week. If your scholar has been sending me their answers throughout the week, I have already corrected their work. All others will need to comment on my dojo post in order to receive their participation grade this week. 

Due:

STUDY ISLAND REMINDER:

All ELA study island lessons will be due Monday, March 23rd. The original due date was last Friday, February 28th, but I am giving students a three week extension to ensure we are exposed to as much practice as possible prior to the AzMerit test next month.
 
Students will have time in class to complete lessons over the next two weeks as well as the entire week of Spring Break (March 16-20) to work on the lessons at home. I have encouraged students to work on at least one lesson every night at home until all have been completed WITH AT LEAST 70% PROFICIENCY.
 
They will be bringing home their score sheets tomorrow so they know which lessons they need to be working on. I do take an "accountability grade" for study island. There are 40 independent lessons. I take a grade every 10 lessons completed with 70% or higher.
 
Please assist me in ensuring these lessons get done by their extended due date. Thank you!

Due:

Complete p127-128, “Writing Complex Sentences 3,” in your Skillsbook and use it as a resource to combine shorter sentences in your editorial.

Due:

Read your editorial to a family member at home and think of a creative title for your writing.

Due:

Finish the closing paragraph to your editorial by reflecting on your opinion and reasons and giving your reader something to think about.

Due:

Finish the intro paragraph to your editorial by introducing your topic and giving your opinion statement.

Due:

Students should read the editorial "Pro Athletes' Salaries Aren't Overly Exorbitant" and complete prompts A, B, and C on lined paper. We will be completing the second editorial, "Do Professional Athletes Get Paid Too Much?," in class together on Friday. 

Due:

Students have been working in small groups to write a cause-and-effect essay on Global Warming with a Google Slide presentation to accompany it. They should practice reading their paragraph aloud to a family member at home to prepare for their classroom presentations on Wednesday. The checklist for their presentation is attached should they wish to review the expectations. 

Due:

Students should outline their research notecards in their writing journal over the weekend. We will be continuing outlines in class on Friday, January 24th for Paragraphs 3-5. The entire sentence outline will need to be completed by Monday, January 27th, as we will begin drafting our research report that week. 
 
Students should follow the format listed below:
Interesting Fact & Thesis Statement
I. Topic Sentence (for first middle paragraph on major accomplishments)
     A. Supporting Detail
          a. Elaboration if any
          b. Elaboration if any 
     B. Supporting Detail
          a. Elaboration if any
          b. Elaboration if any
II. Topic Sentence (for second middle paragraph on major accomplishments) 
III.Topic Sentence (for third middle paragraph on major accomplishments)
IV.Topic Sentence (for conclusion on legacy) 
 
BE SURE TO INCLUDE AN ABBREVIATION OF THE WEBSITE THAT YOU FOUND THE INFORMATION ON AFTER EACH SENTENCE TO PROPERLY CITE WITHIN YOUR PAPER. 

Due:

Students should outline their research notecards in their writing journal over the weekend. We will be starting outlines in class on Thursday, January 23rd for Paragraphs 1 &2. The entire sentence outline will need to be completed by Monday, January 27th, as we will begin drafting our research report that week.

Students should follow the format listed below:
Interesting Fact & Thesis Statement
I. Topic Sentence (for first middle paragraph on major accomplishments)
A. Supporting Detail
a. Elaboration if any
b. Elaboration if any
B. Supporting Detail
a. Elaboration if any
b. Elaboration if any
II. Topic Sentence (for second middle paragraph on major accomplishments)
III.Topic Sentence (for third middle paragraph on major accomplishments)
IV.Topic Sentence (for conclusion on legacy)

BE SURE TO INCLUDE AN ABBREVIATION OF THE WEBSITE THAT YOU FOUND THE INFORMATION ON AFTER EACH SENTENCE TO PROPERLY CITE WITHIN YOUR PAPER.

Due:

TW will review how to write a thesis statement by combining an interesting subject and a special part to emphasize. SW review their research notes and choose one main point they could make about their topic, writing their own thesis statement. SW begin their sentence outlines. Those that need additional time to research their topic will have one last day in class to do so. 
 
ALL RESEARCH NEEDS TO BE COMPLETED BY WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23rd. We will be working solely on our sentence outlines TH/F of this week. 

Due:

SW research the legacy of their research topic person by gathering details about what their effect on the world was and why they are considered inspirational.
 
Students will have time to research in class, but can continue at home if they'd like! 

Due:

SW use the information they gathered on major accomplishments to narrow down their search for background information. TW model how to do this on the board (ex- if you are writing about Truman taking over for Roosevelt as president during WWII, you will likely only choose background information relating to his experience in politics, administration, and foreign policy).
 
Students will have time to do this in class, but can continue their research at home if they'd like! 

Due:

Students must finish their MLA Webpage Citations and submit Friday by the end of class before moving on with their research. Please see the attached worksheet. 
 

Due:

Students should think of a person who inspires them and be prepared to share their research topic with the class. 
 
"History is full of stories of amazing people- whether ancient kings and queens who lived long ago or heroes who are still living today. We can learn a lot by finding out how these people grew from childhood to adulthood, what obstacles they faced along the way, and how they overcame them. Their stories can inspire us to accomplish great things ourselves. 
 
You will write a report about a person who inspires you. You will use the research skills you learned last week to uncover important information about this person. You will then compile the information in a research report to share with your classmates. Along the way, you're sure to learn a lot about your subject- and about yourself."  

Due:

Students will need to rewrite their problem-solution persuasive essay over winter break and turn in their final copy the Monday we return. Students will need to revise for the six traits of writing. We have started revisions in class the week prior to break, and I have attached instructions from their textbook below to reference over break as needed. 
 
I will be collecting both the draft (marked up with revisions) and the final copy. 

Due:

Circle five weak adjectives within your essay and replace them with five from the vivid word choice handout. Underline the word "said" in your essay and replace it with an alternative. 

Due:

Highlight the 5Ws (who, what, where, when, why) and H (how) questions in your essay. 

Due:

On Monday, students brainstormed a list of problems in middle school on the board and we selected "bullying" as our topic to write about in our problem-solution persuasive essay. We created a problem-solution chart and drafted the introductory paragraph together. Students had class time on Monday to draft their second paragraph illustrating why bullying is a serious problem. Tuesday, students will work on the other two body paragraphs and closing paragraph. An outline of what each paragraph should include is below. First drafts are due Wednesday, December 18th.  If students are struggling with their drafts, they can reference the "Types of Writing Playbook" for sentence starters for their persuasive essay, as well as the "Avoid Fuzzy Thinking" and "Gathering Details" charts attached. 
 
Paragraph 1- introduces the problem and gives an opinion statement
Paragraph 2- convinces the reader the problem is serious
Paragraph 3- proposes a solution
Paragraph 4- persuades the reader to help solve the problem
Paragraph 5- answers a possible objection and calls the reader to action

Due:

Students have been working on their introduction and body paragraphs of their compare-contrast essay in class. They will need to complete the concluding paragraph for homework and return with their completed essay on Friday, December 13th. Please refer to the effective strategies for ending your essay below:
 
1. Emphasize a key idea.
White sharks and dolphins are both great hunters of the deep, but only sharks are known for attacking humans. 
 
2. Add a new insight.
Perhaps the biggest difference between sharks and dolphins is that dolphins are smart, friendly mammals, but sharks are small-brained and cold-blooded fish. 
 
3. Refer back to your beginning.
The gray dorsal fin comes out of the water- but it this a shark or a dolphin?
 
Ending Paragraph: The comparison- contrast is summed up in a thoughtful way. 
So whatever happened to the ocean swimmer? The gray dorsal fin comes out of the water- but is this a shark or a dolphin? The creature leaps over the swimmer and squeaks a greeting before diving again. That's one final difference between sharks and dolphins. Dolphins are very curios and very friendly, so the swimmer can breathe easily- just like his friend, the dolphin. 

Due:

Venn Diagram comparing and contrasting two animals in writing notebook due Wednesday, December 11th. Students should use their graphic organizer to create an organized list to plan their essay. Their list should include a focus statement and three topic sentences for each body paragraph with the compare-contrast information listed below. Please see example:
 
Focus Statement: White sharks and dolphins have similar shapes and diets but are very different animals. 
 
1. Both white sharks and dolphins have bodies that are perfect for life at sea.
-same shape, different tail
-sharks twice as big
-same color, different texture
 
2. Both of these great ocean hunters enjoy the same favorite foods.
-both follow schools of fish
-different teeth
-dolphins picky; sharks not
 
3. Even though both white sharks and dolphins live in warm ocean waters, they lead very different lives. 
-sharks loners; dolphins in pods
-dolphins "talk", sharks do not
-both follow ships 

Due:

In a persuasive paragraph, you share your opinion (or strong feeling) about a topic. To be persuasive, you must include plenty of reasons, facts, and details to support your opinion. Persuasive writing is usually organized by order of importance or by logical order (as in the paragraph below). 
 
Persuasive Paragraph: Write an opinion about an outdoor activity. Include at least three strong reasons that support your opinion. 

Due:

In an expository paragraph, you share information. You can explain a subject, give directions, or show how to do something. Transition words like first, next, then, and finally are often used in expository writing. 
 
Expository Paragraph: Write a paragraph that explains a sport that you know very well. Be sure to use transitions to connect your ideas. 

Due:

When you write a descriptive paragraph, you give a detailed picture of a person, a place, an object, or an event. Descriptive paragraphs include many sensory details (sight, sound, smell, taste, touch). 
 
Descriptive Paragraph: Write a paragraph that describes a place. Use lots of sights, sounds, and other sensory details in your description. 

Due:

Final Draft of Phase Autobiography due Friday, November 22nd. Students will turn in their revised rough draft, editing checklist, and final copy of their writing. Their phase autobiographies will be added to their student portfolios and kept on file to reference during future parent-teacher conferences. 

Due:

Students will complete the Revising and Editing Checklist on their phase autobiography. Students were given a copy of the checklist in class today. They should take their time revising their writing and reviewing the editing checklist prior to writing their final draft. Teacher will conference with students on Thursday, November 21st to ensure checklists were completed. 

Due:

First draft of phase autobiography due Wednesday for quick check! 
 
Beginning: Draw the reader in and introduce the stage you are describing. Start with the first event. Tell what began this stage in your life. 
 
Middle: Let your story unfold and bring it to a high point.  Be selective. Include events that keep the story moving along. Leave out unneeded details, but include sensory details. 
 
End: Describe how the stage ends. Consider using one of the following approaches for your ending- 1. Reveal why the stage was important. Make sure your reader understands the significance of this stage. 2. Tell how the experience changed you. Tell what you learned from the stage or how you are different because of it. 
 

Due:

Finish life map with at least ten phases and descriptions. Circle one you wish to write about this week in your Phase Autobiography! 

Due:

Students completed a simple science experiment with Mr. Eaton this past week. They took notes in their science notebooks as we will be collaborating on another descriptive writing piece as we practice writing across the curriculum. Students will use their notes to create a lab report in composition class. Students will have time to complete the lab report in class on Friday, November 8th. If they do not finish in class, it is due upon their return from the long weekend.
 
The rubric for the lab report is attached. 
 
I've also attached an example lab report as well as helpful writing tips should students need to reference them at home. 

Due:

Students have been working on an ELA and SS collaboration to practice descriptive writing. They are describing an important place during the French Revolution. They have been working in groups and will present on Thursday, November 7th. I will be grading them individually on their cluster maps and presentation. I will be giving a group grade for their essay and visual display. The rubrics for their group grades are attached. 
 
An example of a descriptive essay and writing tips are also attached should students need to reference them at home. 

Due:

Students studied sentence fluency on Thursday this week. They will need to complete p113 in their SkillsBook "Combining Sentences Using Key Words" for homework by Friday, October 25th. They will have time to start it in class and will tear the worksheet out of their workbook so they do not have to drag their book home should they not finish it in class. 
 
They can combine sentences with adjectives, participles, or adverbs. An example of each is listed on their worksheet. 
 
Sometimes a single word can make a world of difference in a sentence. One added key word can provide just the extra touch needed to add impact to your sentence. If you have used two sentence to explain something, it's always a good idea to see if you can combine the two sentences by "borrowing" a key word from one and adding it to the other for better sentence fluency. Combining sentences by using key words can help you create more concise, mature sentences. 

Due:

Students reviewed the writing process on Monday and learned how to write with voice. They must complete the Try It activity from their WriteSource textbook by Tuesday. It states:
"Write a brief note to a teacher explaining something that you really like about the class. Then write another note, this time to a friend in class, about the same topic. The one of each note should different." 

Due:

Student will choose two animals or items that can be lost, found, or for sale and write two classified ads on the newspaper template attached. Must have correct MUG (mechanics, usage, and grammar) and use the descriptive writing techniques we used this past week in class. 
 
Students will start this activity on Friday, October 18th in composition class. It only becomes weekend homework if they did not finish in class. 
 
Example Ads:
FOUND: Small black and white cat. Red collar with silver bells and pearls. Found near 5th and Walnut Call Julie, 555-4321, after 3:00pm. 
 
FOR SALE: Parrot named Lincoln. Recites Gettysburg Address. $20, cage included. Call 555-1342 and ask to talk to Lincoln. 

Due:

Students spent Thursday completing partner revisions on their descriptive writing essays. They circled "basic" words that the writer should consider switching for more academic vocabulary. They had to include at least one simile or metaphor in their writing as well. 
 
Students then started on their final draft in class on lined paper. They must write in their neatest and best! Final drafts are due on Friday, October 18th. 
 
Paragraph 1- Introduce the Topic
"Blue metal lockers line the hallways in our school. Each locker is identical except for the brass number attached to the door. Locker number 379 is mine. This locker is my home away from home for the year."
-The beginning shows why this place is special.

Middle Paragraphs (at least three)- Focus on a Different Aspect of the Description
"When I click open my locker, the smell of peanut butter escapes from a brown paper lunch bag on the top shelf. Under the bag, the sleeve of my old olive green sweatshirt dangles off the shelf. On top of everything is my favorite blue cap. Some magazines that I've shoved up there, way in the back, almost hide my dead CD player."
-The middle paragraphs will describe the locker from top to bottom.

Concluding Paragraph- Make a final comment about the topic
"On the last day of school, I'll take down the pictures and throw out the candy wrappers and trash. I'll stuff all the important things into my backpack and grab those smelly gym clothes. When I close my locker for the last time and head for home, it will feel as if I've completed another chapter in my life."
-The ending gives more insight into the writer's personality while concluding the description.

Due:

Finish concluding paragraph of descriptive writing essay. Students brainstormed a list of prewriting topics describing a place on Monday and spent Tuesday developing their writing. 
 
Paragraph 1- Introduce the Topic
"Blue metal lockers line the hallways in our school. Each locker is identical except for the brass number attached to the door. Locker number 379 is mine. This locker is my home away from home for the year." 
-The beginning shows why this place is special. 
 
Middle Paragraphs (at least three)- Focus on a Different Aspect of the Description
"When I click open my locker, the smell of peanut butter escapes from a brown paper lunch bag on the top shelf. Under the bag, the sleeve of my old olive green sweatshirt dangles off the shelf. On top of everything is my favorite blue cap. Some magazines that I've shoved up there, way in the back, almost hide my dead CD player." 
-The middle paragraphs will describe the locker from top to bottom. 
 
Concluding Paragraph- Make a final comment about the topic 
"On the last day of school, I'll take down the pictures and throw out the candy wrappers and trash. I'll stuff all the important things into my backpack and grab those smelly gym clothes. When I close my locker for the last time and head for home, it will feel as if I've completed another chapter in my life." 
-The ending gives more insight into the writer's personality while concluding the description. 

Due:

Students need to finish their 5 paragraph essay that compares and contrasts John Henri Dunant's contributions to the Red Cross with Clara Burton's contributions. We read the attached writing prompt together and took notes in our writing notebooks. They should use the rubric, Venn Diagram in their notes, and the writing prompt itself to write three body paragraphs. We did the introduction and conclusion together. This must be completed for weekend homework as I am taking a grade for it Monday, October 14th. Any late essays will ensue a 10% off late deduction per day. 

Due:

Students need to finish revising the example essay #2 without a title on slide 11 of the attached PowerPoint. They were given a full size copy to correct in class and make revisions based on task, audience, and purpose using the rubric. Due Friday, October 11th, upon arrival to class.

Due:

Students need to finish revising the example essay #1 titled "The Contributions of Both" on slide 3 of the attached PowerPoint. They were given a full size copy to correct in class and make revisions based on task, audience, and purpose using the rubric. Due Wednesday, October 9th, upon arrival to class.

Due:

Complete "What's on the Menu?" Grammar Project. Students should have completed their planning guide in class. Menu should be at least one full page including the nine requirements listed on the planning guide. Presentation should be neatly put together, colorful, interesting and stimulating to look at, and use pictures as appropriate. 
 
Please see the attachment for the planning guide and rubric. 
 
Students should also study notes for their quiz on Friday- parts of speech (nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs). Quiz is also attached should students wish to review it before Friday. 

Due:

Students will write and submit their own adverb poem. Please see PPT for instructions and examples. 

Due:

On the reverse side of their Adjective Word Challenge worksheet, students will write their name down the side and create an acrostic poem about themselves using only positive adjectives tp describe themselves. 
 
Positive
Adventurous
Reliable
Ravenous after work 

Due:

PARENT- STUDENT HOMEWORK
1. Please subscribe to my teacher webpage for BOTH Literature and Composition in your student's section. Due Monday. Worth 10 points. 
2. Please join class dojo. You should look for your students HOMEROOM teacher and their section. All of your child's co-teachers will be added to the class so every teacher your child sees throughout the day will have the opportunity to award points and message parents as needed. Your child is being sent home today with the code you need to subscribe once you download the ClassDojo app. 
 
PLEASE SEE THE ATTACHMENT FOR FURTHER INSTRUCTIONS. A paper copy will be sent home with your child today. Thank you! 

Due:

JOURNAL ENTRIES MUST BE SUBMITTED BY FRIDAY FOR GRADE. 
Students should have close to a full page of writing on each topic listed below. 
1. What does courage up mean?
2. What is love?
3. FREE WRITE
4. Why is racism still alive?
5. What would you ask the president? 
 
We spend the first 10-15 minutes on Friday's writing in our journals. If you are missing a topic, I suggest setting a timer at home for 10-15 minutes and writing as much as you can about the topic before the timer goes off. The average journal write for 7th grade as been one sentence per minute so entries should be 10 sentences in length at the very least. 

Due:

Students should be studying for their composition exam this Friday on the following topics: subjects and predicates, and nouns. They should have the notes in the attached PPT in their notebooks, but may want to refer back to the PPT for additional practice. We started reviewing a sample test together in class on Monday and I have attached it should students want to practice taking it at home prior to our exam day at the end of this week. 

Due:

Study for Composition Test on Monday! Subjects and Predicates, Nouns, and Noun Phrases. 
Notes from this week are attached, but they should also be in their writing journals. They can also use the practice activities from last week as study guides. 

Due:

Students will write three sentences on the back of their "Concrete and Abstract Noun Chart." Each sentence should include at least three words from the chart. They will underline all of their nouns and label them as common (C) or proper (P). 

Due:

Finish the Next Step writing activity from 'Subjects and Predicates 2' if you did not finish in class. 
 
"Skydiving is a sport that requires skill and daring. Write a paragraph explaining why you would or would not want to be a skydiver. Be sure to write in complete sentences." 
 
Example of complete sentence: The large, umbrella-shaped parachute saved the life of the inexperienced pilot. (The complete subject is the simple subject- "parachute"-plus all its modifiers. The complete predicate is the simple predicate- "saved"- plus all its modifers.)
 
 

Due:

Finish robot paragraph and illustration if you did not finish in class. We will present on Wednesday and Thursday of this week. Robot paragraph prompt is below. If students need assistance drawing, they may use the attached direct drawing instructions. 
 
"Imagine having your own robot. Write a paragraph describing what your personal robot would be like. Be sure to include complete sentences- those including subjects and predicates. Then, draw an illustration to accompany your paragraph."
 
Example of Simple Subject: Marjorie owns a robot that carries her books for her. (The simple subject is who or what the sentence is about.)
 
Example of Simple Predicate: Felicia's robot will obey all her commands. (The predicate-or verb-tells something about the subject. Remember: helping verbs like "will" are often part of the simple predicate.) 

Due:

Spelling Tic-Tac-Toe packet due. Please see PDF attached. Use Spelling List #1 in your writing notebook. Study for spelling test on Monday!
Spelling List #1 Below:
abandon
abbreviation
absence
absolutely
absorb
abundant
accessible
accompanied
accomplishment
accurate

Due:

Finish 'Quotation Marks and Italics' if you did not finish in class. 
 
Quotation marks are used to punctuate titles of shorter works. Titles of longer works are italicized (please underline on your worksheet since we are handwriting them). Punctuate sentences 1-16 using quotation marks and italics. Remember that periods and commas are always placed inside quotation marks. 
 
You DO NOT need to complete the Next Step writing on the back. 

Due:

Finish Comma Review worksheet if you did not finish in class. It should be in your writing folder in the homework side. 

Due:

Finish your letter to the principal if you did not finish in class. Write a letter to Ms. Johnson about what you like most about AMSPA. Your letter should start with "Dear Ms. Johnson," you should indent with each new paragraph (beginning, middle, and end), and you should conclude with "Sincerely," before signing your name. Remember to include at least one interruption, one direct address, and one interjection. 
 
Commas sometimes separate the unnecessary parts of sentences from the necessary parts. For example, when a word or phrase or clause is not necessary to the basic meaning of a sentence, that word or phrase or clause is separated from the rest of the sentence by a comma or by commas. Interruptions, nouns of direct address, or interjections are considered nonessential and are separated from the main sentence with commas. 
 
EXAMPLES: Don't you just love our new campus, Ms. Johnson? (noun of direct address)
AMSPA, believe it or not, is a brand new school. (interruption)
Of course, just the thought of being the first seventh grade class on site excites me! (interjection)

Due:

Finish NEXT STEP WRITING ACTIVITY if you did not finish in class. Write a paragraph about a particular plant or animal that interests you. Try to use several compound sentences in your writing. Remember to combine your independent clauses with a comma and coordinating conjunction. Avoid creating comma splices, which result from combining two sentences without a conjunction. 
 
EXAMPLE: Blue whales are the largest living creatures. Tortoises have the longest living life span. 
Blue whales are the largest living creatures, but tortoises have the longest life span.